Happy Thanksgiving!

I just wanted to take a few minutes to wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving! I appreciate each & every one of you & your support over the last several years. Much has changed for me over the years since I dropped a few hives at the dairy to provide pollination for the guys at Cha Bella. All of you have played an integral part in the progress I’ve made with the apiary & I thank you all!

Honeybees trained to detect cancer!

This is the most astonishing thing I have ever heard approximately the honeybee! I had head of a dog that a Japanese scientist had found at a shelter that was able to detect cancer cells by smell. If I remember correctly, he had identified that a gene she possessed allowed for this. Alas, she was spayed by the shelter so he was not able to breed her. This solves that problem!

http://abcnews.go.com/health/t/blogEntry?id=21008445

 

CCD related to bee genetics? Where have I heard THAT before?

I’ve said it a MILLION times! The health of your colonies all comes down to your queens. I breed my queens in the apiary where they are utilized & select for survivor colonies & specific desired traits. Do I experience issues with colony losses? NEVER! Yes, it takes work, & yes it takes a little science & even a little math (which Jason Allred should leave to the professionals) yet it is well worth the effort!

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/bee-sperm-bank-prevent-colony-collapse-disorder/story?id=19403788

Black Widdah…

Found a little friend hiding under a bottom board a few weeks ago.  These spiders LOVE honeybees.  She was massive & had a rather large egg sack that she was protecting.  Remember to wear gloves or be very careful reaching up under your hives!

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Back to Business

So I looked up this morning & realized that it has been over six months since I’ve had/taken the time to obtain a blog post written. Such is life. Alot can happen in half a year, & alot has! Junior year of Dental School has a reputation of being one of the most difficult, exhausting & demanding challenges that a person can experience. Having been through that grinder I can concur! But as things with school wind down my commitment to my bees is again becoming more of a focus & many tremendous things have been happening in the Apiary; just an overview for now & I’ll spend some time getting more in depth later. I have started queen rearing again & will be having queens & nucs available in the spring; I’ve expanded the yard accordingly & have added another dozen working hives. I’v moreover been experimenting with a new rearing method & have had tremendous success; I’ll make an extensive post as I go back into rearing this coming Spring. Harvest went well this past season, 16 buckets from 10 working hives! The book is coming along; I have an outline pretty well established & a few chapters fleshed out; if you’ve never used Dragon software to write you should try it; it’s been key to getting that far! The intermediate/advanced beekeeping class is still in the works. Given my schedule the next year & the effect the seasons have on the bees activity & productivity it makes sense to me to start the course just after harvest in July or August & run through the following year. At least this is what seems to make the most sense as I finalize getting the lessons written & the course organized. So my apologies for putting the blog on the furthest back burner; I’ve been a busy little bee. This semester is the edge of the cliff, once we complete finals December 10th the course load falls of substantially & we spend the majority of our remaining months here in clinic. Look forward to my bee-life returning to normal; I certainly do!